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  • Design2Learn Team

4 insights on the use of LxD by teachers and educators

We asked more than 80 teachers and educators from all paths of life (working in non-formal learning, youth workers, museum educators,…) how

they design learning experiences and what could actually help them in that process.


Our research concluded that the concept of learning experience design itself is still unknown to most educators. And even if there is a high level of consciousness among educators and teachers around the need to not only contextualise learning experiences but also learn about learners’ needs, we also identified some key ingredients missing in their design practice. In other words, our research demonstrates that at the moment when educators “cook up” a learning experience, not all of them follow the LxD “recipe” step-by-step.


Resulting in the following conclusions:


1 - Lack of an in-depth learner-centred approach


Educators admit that they often use methods they already know with small adaptations. Stating “lack of time”, “lack of ideal conditions” and “lack of resources” as their biggest challenges when trying to design learning experiences that are meaningful, positive and profound.


2 - Those working in Non-formal Education have a bigger focus on the learning space


As teachers are many times bound to the classroom and the limited resources within it, thinking of the sensory experience of their students while preparing classes might not always be the highest priority in their agenda. Other kinds of educators - such as those working in museums, for example - will pay more attention to this aspect of the learning journey.


By providing the correct tools, the Learning Experience Design methodology can support practitioners to tackle the reason why their learning experiences are not as tasty and nurturing as they can be and thereby find the right spices to improve them.

3 - Less experienced educators tend to be less focused on learners’ needs


The capacity to reflect on our own practice as educators tends to grow along with our experience. Therefore less experienced educators seem to be less aware of the importance of a learner-centred approach.


4 - More easy-to-follow content on LxD would be great, thank you!


The vast majority of the educators we surveyed stated they could benefit from some guidance in LxD. Educators stated that keeping a positive attitude, being flexible, being creative and cooperating among peers can be a great first step to deal with their difficulties. Nevertheless, easy access to inspirational content online, a practical training course or instructions step by step/examples of session outlines are also mentioned as the leading way towards designing better learning experiences!


Despite our culinary metaphor, what we really want to say is that the educational field and its professionals are aware of the ongoing changes and challenges that have been rising and there is a will to adapt and innovate.


By providing the correct tools, the Learning Experience Design methodology can support practitioners to tackle the reason why their learning experiences are not as tasty and nurturing as they can be and thereby find the right spices to improve them.


Check more info about our research here and download the full research report!


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